MILITARY APPRECIATION MONTH

MILITARY APPRECIATION MONTH

 

insignia-flags-ts200Congress designated May as National Military Appreciation Month in 1999 to ensure the nation was given the opportunity to publically demonstrate their appreciation for the sacrifices and successes made by our servicemembers – past and present. Each year the president makes a proclamation, reminding Americans of the important role the U.S. Armed Forces have played in the history and development of our country.

 

May was selected because it has most days set aside for celebrating and commemorating our military’s achievements. These days include Loyalty Day, which was established in 1921, Victory in Europe (VE) Day commemorating the end of WWII in Europe on May 8, 1945, Armed Forces Day created in 1949, Military Spouse Appreciation Day established in 1984, and of course the best known of the May holidays, Memorial Day.

Memorial Day, is the only federal holiday in May and is celebrated on the last Monday of the month. The day, dating from the Civil War era, traditionally has marked recognition of those who have died in service to the nation. Each year on Memorial Day, the White House Commission on Remembrance promotes one minute of silence at 3 p.m. local time to honor the military’s fallen comrades and to pay tribute to the sacrifices by the nation’s service members and veterans.

National Military Appreciation Month: What’s It All About?

National Military Appreciation Month started as a simple idea; to gather America around its military family to honor, remember, recognize and appreciate those who have served and those now serving and to know the history behind it all. Subsequent formal legislation informs our servicemembers that their country has set aside an entire month to honor, remember and appreciate them.

In 1999, legislation passed in the U.S. Senate designating May as National Military Appreciation Month, with the support and sponsorship of Senator John McCain (R-AZ) and Representative Duncan Hunter (R-CA) of San Diego and over 50 veteran service organizations. In April 2004 more comprehensive legislation was passed by unanimous consent of both Houses of Congress, H. Con. Res. 328, that May is National Military Appreciation Month and urges the President to issue an annual proclamation calling on the American people to recognize this special month of May through appropriate ceremonies and events.

Message from Mrs. Deborah Mullen, a Navy mom and wife of Admiral Mullen, former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff:

I can personally attest to the inner strength military families develop through deployments, frequent moves and new cultural experiences. There is, of course, much to love about a military life and a lot to value about the richness and diversity it brings to our children’s perspectives.

But as I meet with military families across the country, it is clear to me that a decade of war in Iraq and Afghanistan has challenged them, stretched them, and tested their resilience and strength in unprecedented ways.

That reality isn’t always readily seen or understood by the rest of America.

My husband Michael speaks frequently on this topic. He notes that today, less than 1 percent of our nation’s population serves in uniform.

We are concerned that people who used to have day-to-day connections with military men and women and their families may not know much about them anymore, so they are simply unaware of the stress and challenges these families face ‘ a situation compounded by the fact that most military families bear their burdens quietly.

It is evident to me that people care and want to help. Often, they just don’t know what to do to support our military families in the ways they need it most, particularly as they transition back to their communities and to civilian life.

That’s why April’s Month of the Military Child and May’s Military Appreciation Month are important efforts that help us get moving in the right direction. They keep us talking. They offer avenues for appreciation and action. These things can only strengthen the connections between communities and our military. I also believe they can only strengthen our country.

There are many ways, big and small, to get involved. However, people choose to support, the concept is straightforward. Our military men and women and their families do so much and sacrifice so much to take care of America. This is about doing everything we can to ‘ together ‘ take care of them ‘ not just in April or May but year round.

Article Provided By: Military.com

NTHS shield logoThe National Technical Honor Society honors the achievements of leading career and technical education students and cultivates excellence in today’s highly competitive, skilled workforce. NTHS also provides Scholarships to Student and Alumni Members and will be awarding $235,000 this year. Discover us at nths.org and bring recognition to your top technical students.

Friday the 13th: 5 Things To Know About Why The Date Is So Scary

Friday the 13th

Run and hide! It’s Friday the 13th, the unluckiest day in the year! Yet, for those wondering why today is so frightening and full of superstitions, here are 5 things to know about Friday the 13th’s unlucky origins.

Boo! It’s Friday the 13th, the one day on the calendar to give anyone the chills. It’s a day known for bad luck and Jason Voorhees (of the Friday the 13th films) but why is this day so terrifying? Do your best to avoid any broken mirrors while you learn more about this horrifying holiday.

 

1. Friday the 13th’s reputation has origins in Christianity.

While there’s no exact specific reason why Friday the 13th is considered unlucky, some have suggested it’s a combination of two major superstitions, according to USA Today. Friday was once considered a day of “general ill omen,” according to Iowa State history professor, Michael Bailey, because according to Christianity, Jesus Christ was crucified on a Friday.

2. 13 being unlucky is another religious superstition.

There were also 13 people at the Last Supper, which cursed that number as bad luck. “The number 13 became a problematic number because of the number of people at that table during that fateful event,” Dr. Phil Stevens, associate professor of anthropology at the University of Buffalo, told TIME magazine. Since then, the number 13 has been seen as unlucky.

3. The day became unlucky in the Middle Ages. 

Fridays and the number 13 became the Taylor Swift squad of unluckiness around the Middle Ages, according to the Daily Record. On Friday, October 13, 1307, the King of France sentenced hundreds of the Knights Templar to death. Fridays were also known as “Hangman’s Day,” when most public executions were held. However, in 1907, Thomas W. Lawson‘s novel, Friday, the Thirteenth, popularized the unlucky superstition in the modern world.

4. There are some frightening myths associated with Friday The 13th.

Forget black cats, broken mirrors or walking under ladders. There are some serious superstitions involved in Friday the 13th, according to International Business Times. If you cut your hair on this day, someone in your family will die, according to legend. If a funeral procession passes you by on Friday the 13th, supposedly YOU will be the next to die. Plus, children born today will be unlucky for life, according to superstition.

5. Not everyone fears Friday the 13th.

Friday the 13th is considered unlucky in Western superstition, but Tuesday the 13th is considered unlucky in Spanish-speaking countries. In Italy, people fear Friday the 17th because 13 is considered a lucky number in the country.

What do you think? Do you consider Friday the 13th unlucky?

Article Provided By: HollywoodLife

 

NTHS shield logoThe National Technical Honor Society honors the achievements of leading career and technical education students and cultivates excellence in today’s highly competitive, skilled workforce. NTHS also provides Scholarships to Student and Alumni Members and will be awarding $235,000 this year. Discover us at nths.org and bring recognition to your top technical students.

National Nurses Week 2016

Celebrate National Nurses Week 2016!

Join ANA and NTHS in celebrating the important role nurses play in health care during National Nurses Week, May 6 to 12, 2016.

National Nurses Week

National Nurses Week begins each year on May 6 and ends on May 12, Florence Nightingale’s birthday. These permanent dates enhance planning and position National Nurses Week as an established recognition event. As of 1998, May 8 was designated as National Student Nurses Day, to be celebrated annually. And as of 2003, National School Nurse Day is celebrated on the Wednesday within National Nurses Week each year.

The nursing profession has been supported and promoted by the American Nurses Association (ANA) since 1896. Each of ANA’s state and territorial nurses associations promotes the nursing profession at the state and regional levels. Each conducts celebrations on these dates to recognize the contributions that nurses and nursing make to the community.

The ANA and NTHS supports and encourages National Nurses Week recognition programs through the state and district nurses associations, other specialty nursing organizations, educational facilities, and independent health care companies and institutions.

Article Provided By: American Nurses Association

NTHS shield logoThe National Technical Honor Society honors the achievements of leading career and technical education students and cultivates excellence in today’s highly competitive, skilled workforce. NTHS also provides Scholarships to Student and Alumni Members and will be awarding $235,000 this year. Discover us at nths.org and bring recognition to your top technical students.

NTHS Chapter News May 2016

NTHS Chapter News

Take a look at NTHS chapter news from around the country.

A.W. Beattie NTHS members 2

NTHS members at A.W. Beattie Career Center in Allison Park, PA, show off their new NTHS Logo Shield T-shirts.  Advisor Scott Scariot is pictured on the right, and co-advisor Kim Zylinski is on the right. The chapter recently inducted 48 new members.  Scott said, “Our director had me purchase the shirts for our members to increase the awareness of NTHS both in our building and at the members’ home schools.  This year, our members participated in a giving tree at Christmas time and helped collect school supplies for low income students in the spring.”  Great job, NTHS advisors and members!

 

 

Doug Wagner-Manatee Tech

136 new NTHS members were recently inducted to the NTHS chapter at Manatee Technical College in Bradenton, FL. As published in the Lakewood Ranch Herald Tribune, Doug Wagner, director of Manatee Technical College and Adult Career and Technical Education for the School District, impressed upon the students what an elite group they were to be inducted into the National Technical Honor Society, “Of the 5,000 students who have come through our doors this year, you are the 136 who were nominated.”

 

 

 

The NTHS chapter at Admiral Arthur A. Radford High School in Honolulu recently partnered with other clubs on campus to assist with the Great Aloha Run. Advisor Lane Yokoyama says, “It was a FUN day.  We helped over 24.000 runners, joggers and walkers.  All of the donations raised went to local charities. ”  Great teamwork, NTHS members!!

NTHS Chapter

 

 

The Southern Regional Technical College-Moultrie NTHS chapter recently inducted new members.  The chapters at all 3 campuses have been working hard to grow their membership.  Check out these nice looking members!  And what a lovely cake. Thanks to NTHS Advisor Michael Young for sharing.

Chapter 0183 Induction 4-11-16Cake from Chapter 0183

 

The NTHS National Headquarters recently chartered chapter number 4,000 – quite a milestone!  Chapter #4000 is McCann School of Business & Technology in Allentown, PA.  NTHS staff had to celebrate just a little bit.

4000 NTHS Chapters

 

Thanks to all the fantastic NTHS chapters across the county!  We love our members and advisors. Keep sending your photos and news so we can share on our social channels and in our blog and newsletters.  Please send to Carol Kaczmarek – ckaczmarek@nths.org.

Have a great month of May!

NTHS

 

The National Technical Honor Society honors the achievements of leading career and technical education students and cultivates excellence in today’s highly competitive, skilled workforce. NTHS also provides Scholarships to Student and Alumni Members and will be awarding $235,000 this year. Discover us at nths.org and bring recognition to your top technical students.

National Teacher Appreciation Day is May 3rd

Why Teachers Deserve Our Praise and Support

teachersUnlike other careers in which the same method can be applied time and time again, teaching requires an individualized approach as each student learns differently and has a different set of circumstances.

On average, teachers work more than 52 hours a week, including 30 hours on instruction and 22 hours on tasks like preparing lessons and grading papers.

At the same time, teachers work with an average of more than 20 students per class, as well as work with new students each school year.

And the average annual base salary of a full-time public school teacher is only $53,100.

Teachers are real life superheroes. They educate, innovate, encourage and support. Every day they touch the lives of millions of students and their work and impact extends far beyond the boundaries of the classroom.

Want some ways to recognize teachers this week, and all year long?  Click here for ideas from the Education World website.

 

 

Let’s Say Thanks on This National Teacher Appreciation Day

Teacher

Teachers give students so much. A boost of confidence when they really need one. Extra help when they’re having trouble. A welcoming presence when everything else seems out of control. And though we know we can’t ever thank them enough, we can take a moment during National Teacher Appreciation Day to share our appreciation for the special educators in our lives. Remember to thank your NTHS advisors, too!

Join NEA and the National PTA in saying “Thank You” by sharing one of the following on social media during Teacher Appreciation Day, May 3rd or anytime during the first week of May, which is National Teacher Appreciation Week, May 2-6.  And send your photos to NTHS for inclusion in our social media.

  • A picture of yourself with your favorite teacher or NTHS advisor, past or present;
  • A picture of your child with his or her teacher and/or NTHS advisor;
  • A picture of yourself holding a piece of paper with a simple message saying Thank You to a teacher and/or NTHS advisor why you’re thanking him or her.

Be sure to use the hashtag #ThankATeacher when sharing.
You can also share this graphic to spread the word to your friends!

This National Teacher Appreciation Day, let’s show our teachers how much they mean to us!

Article Provided By: National PTA and NEA

NTHS shield logoThe National Technical Honor Society honors the achievements of leading career and technical education students and cultivates excellence in today’s highly competitive, skilled workforce. NTHS also provides Scholarships to Student and Alumni Members and will be awarding $235,000 this year. Discover us at nths.org and bring recognition to your top technical students.

From the Earth Day Network

 Earth Day – April 22

This Earth Day, let’s get really big stuff done for our planet.

Earth Day - 2016

Earth Day – 2016

What are we waiting for? The time is now.

The movement continues.

We are now entering the 46th year of a movement that continues to inspire, challenge ideas, ignite passion, and motivate people to action.

In 1970, the year of the first Earth Day, the movement gave voice to an emerging consciousness, channeling human energy toward environmental issues. Forty-six years later, we continue to grow with groundbreaking ideas and by the power of our example.

And so it begins. Today. Right here and right now. Earth Day is more than just a single day — April 22, 2016. It’s bigger than attending a rally and taking a stand.

Trees for the Earth

Over the next five years, as Earth Day moves closer to its 50th anniversary, we’re calling on you to help us achieve one of our most ambitious goals yet —we’re planting 7.8 billion trees and we’re starting now.

Trees will be the first of five major goals we are undertaking in honor of the five-year countdown to our 50th anniversary. On their own and together, these initiatives will make a significant and measurable impact on the Earth and will serve as the foundation of a cleaner, healthier and more sustainable planet for all.

Why Trees?

Trees help combat climate change.
They absorb excess and harmful CO2 from our atmosphere. In fact, in a single year, an acre of mature trees absorbs the same amount of CO2 produced by driving the average car 26,000 miles.

Trees help us breathe clean air.
Trees absorb odors and pollutant gases (nitrogen oxides, ammonia, sulfur dioxide and ozone) and filter particulates out of the air by trapping them on their leaves and bark.

Trees help communities.
Trees help communities achieve long-term economic and environmental sustainability and provide food, energy and income.

Plant a tree. Make a donation. Activate your friends and social networks.

This Earth Day and beyond, let’s make big stuff happen. Let’s plant 7.8 billion trees for the Earth. Let’s divest from fossil fuels and make cities 100% renewable. Let’s take the momentum from the Paris Climate Summit and build on it.

Let’s start now. And let’s not stop.

We can do this. #trees4earth

Article Provided By: Earth Day Network

 

NTHS shield logoThe National Technical Honor Society honors the achievements of leading career and technical education students and cultivates excellence in today’s highly competitive, skilled workforce. NTHS also provides Scholarships to Student and Alumni Members and will be awarding $235,000. this year. Discover us at nths.org and bring recognition to your top technical students.

 

Dear Future College Students

College Students

A Letter to College Students of Tomorrow

Congratulations! You’ve been accepted into college! If I may, I’d like to share some of my ideas on what it means to go to college, and how to select a college and college program that will prepare you for all of the important things you want to accomplish.

Looking back, it’s amazing to examine how much changes between the ages of 18 and 22. According to law, when we turn 18 a switch is flipped and we become adults. Suddenly we can vote, we can choose where we live, we can decide what classes we take in college.

Choosing which courses to take in college may not seem like a huge decision. Checking boxes to fulfill a patchwork of requirements seems almost too easy. But in essence, you are asking yourself, “What knowledge will equip me with the wisdom required to make life’s big decisions?”

At least, that’s what you should be asking yourself. That particular question was never posed by Freshman Greg. Instead, Freshman Greg set to tackling such imponderables as, “Will this class fit in my schedule?” “Will this professor be fun?” and “Does putting hot dogs in my oatmeal count as breakfast or dinner?”

At 18, I did not identify the gaps in my fundamental knowledge. I did not choose classes that would help fill these gaps and prepare me for the real world. Though legally I was an adult, truthfully I was a college kid who didn’t know any better. And no one told me otherwise.

In fact, colleges across the country have loosened curricular requirements to attract more students. It’s the same reason why so many schools are building state-of-the-art facilities (and passing the bill onto the students in the form of increased tuition prices). Today, according to the What Will They Learn?™ study, less than 40% of colleges require a college-level literature course. Just 18% require an American history or government course, and a paltry 3% require economics.

It worries me that in times like these, so many students are graduating without fundamental courses that I—and quite a number of employers—believe are important for life beyond college. That’s why I have worked on this study for the last 3 years. Of the nearly 1,100 schools that I evaluated last year, only 22 earned an “A” rating in What Will They Learn?™ for the strength of their curriculum. Some are small private schools enrolling a few hundred kids, but a school need not be tiny to be selective about its academic program. The president of the University of Georgia, an “A” school which boasts an undergraduate population of over 26,000 students, recently made a statement about our evaluation. I think his words perfectly sum up the vision that informs a well-designed academic program:  “In an era of cafeteria course loads at many places, where students are free to choose from an array of courses, this place has remained steadfast in the belief that in the first two years, all students should have a similar liberal arts foundation laid in preparation for the specialization to come.”

It is true that students can get a great education from almost any school in the country. The bad news is that the quality of their education is, in many cases, up to them, and many schools will provide little guidance. Students who want a solid foundational education don’t have to go to one of the 22 colleges that earn an “A” rating. They can build their own education—and I hope our study serves as a guide for the type of education that employers want, our country needs, and will serve students long after graduation.  But at many colleges and universities, the burden will be on them to make these informed choices.

John Engler, former governor of Michigan and president of the Business Roundtable, has noted with alarm the shortcomings in college curricula: “Too few schools require their students to develop a firm grounding in core subject areas, the foundation upon which later expertise can be built. This does a disservice not only to the students but also to employers seeking the capable, well-rounded employees they need to compete in the global economy.”  In other words, there are consequences in the job market for poor choices in college.

The fact is, even if some students are well-prepared for college, many will not have studied literature, science, math, economics, and the other fields of knowledge essential for success at a truly collegiate level.

Knowing what I now know, I wonder why the adults often “dumb down” existing requirements and ignore the existing gaps that allow students to graduate without the skills and knowledge that will help them succeed after graduation.

If I could go back and give some advice to Freshman Greg, it would be to not only take courses that pique my interest or fit conveniently into my schedule, but also to take a wide array of foundational courses that would help me in the future.

Greg Lewin, a recent college graduate, is a program officer for curricular reform at the American Council of Trustees and Alumni in Washington, D.C.

 

Article Provided By: ACTA

NTHS shield logoThe National Technical Honor Society honors the achievements of leading career and technical education students and cultivates excellence in today’s highly competitive, skilled workforce. NTHS also provides Scholarships to Student and Alumni Members and will be awarding $235,000. this year. Discover us at nths.org and bring recognition to your top technical students.

 

NTHS Member Marie Clark Is In The Running For Federal Scholarship

NTHS Member Marie Clark

Marie Clark

Marie Clark – NTHS Member at Mercer County Career Center

The U.S. Department of Education has announced Mercer County Career Center student Marie Clark has been named among the candidates for the Presidential Scholars Program for career and technical education students.

Candidates are invited to make application for the prestigious recognition and a strenuous review process is used to select the Presidential Scholar for 2016. Finalists will be announced in early May and winners will be invited to participate in formal recognition ceremonies in Washington, D.C., in June.

Clark is enrolled in the protective services program at the career center and is a senior at Lakeview High School. She has earned numerous industry credentials associated to her program of study. She is president of Skills USA and earlier this year was inducted into the National Technical Honor Society.

As one of the five candidates selected from Pennsylvania, she was honored at the Pennsylvania Career and Technical Administrators Symposium held in Hershey last month.

One of the highest recognition for high school students, the U.S. Presidential Scholars Program was expanded in 2015 to recognize students who demonstrate ability and accomplishments in career and technical education fields.

The list published by the U.S. Department of Education includes the 236 nominees for the 2016 inaugural class of Presidential Scholars in Career and Technical Education. Candidates are nominated through their chief state school officer and selected based on demonstration of academic rigor, technical competence, employable skills, ingenuity and creativity.

Article Provided By: The Sharon Herald, Pennsylvania

 

NTHS shield logoThe National Technical Honor Society honors the achievements of leading career and technical education students, like Marie Clark and cultivates excellence in today’s highly competitive, skilled workforce. NTHS also provides Scholarships to Student and Alumni Members and will be awarding $235,000. this year. Discover us at nths.org and bring recognition to your top technical students.

Easter: Why is it so early this year, and how is it determined?

Easter

Easter Sunrise

Easter

Everyone here at NTHS has been wondering why Easter is so early and this explains it.

Easter is fast approaching as Lent draws to a close and the festival takes place this Sunday  March 27. If you’re left with a feeling that time has passed particularly quickly this year, you’re not mistaken. This is because, rather than having a fixed date like Christmas, Easter’s date fluctuates every year. This year, the date is the earliest for almost a decade.

Why does Easter’s date change each year?

As a general rule, it falls on the first Sunday which follows the first full moon after March 21. The convoluted system is the product of a mix of Hebrew, Roman and Egyptian culture and calendars.

The Egyptians based their calendar on the movement on the Sun, which was adopted by Roman and then Christian culture. However, Judaism used one based on the phases of the moon, which Islam also incorporates.

Easter’s date fluctuates due to an attempt to harmonise these solar and lunar calendars. However, the issue is further complicated as there is no one fixed way to calculate Easter. Rather, more than a dozen different formulas exist.

Why can’t it be the same date every year?

Many people have called for the system to be simplified to reduce confusion. In 1928 an Easter Act was passed which fixed the date as the first Sunday after the second Saturday in April.

However, the law did not catch on and very few people adopted it. It has never been enforced by the Government and has largely been forgotten.

Why is it so early this year?

The most common date for Easter is 19th of April, making this year’s date very early.

The earliest it can be is 22nd of March. However, it has not fallen on this date since 1818 and won’t fall here again until 2285.

The latest day on which Easter can fall is April 25. This last happened in 1943 and will next come round in 2038.

Article Provided By: Independent

 

The Staff of NTHS Wishes You a Happy and Safe Holiday Weekend!

NTHS shield logo

The National Technical Honor Society honors the achievements of leading career and technical education students, provides scholarships, and cultivates excellence in today’s highly competitive, skilled workforce. Discover us at nths.org and bring recognition to your top technical students.

Haiti – NTHS Members Tour Local Schools

Westenior Valmera tours Haiti schools

Westenior Valmera (far right) tours Haiti schools

Haiti

Fourteen American students from the St. Louis University, Missouri, set off recently on a one week visit in northern Haiti. Among the group was NTHS member Westenior Valmera, who initiated the educational tour. He is native to Haiti and shared significant history of his homeland with his fellow students, as well as the importance of working with Haitian youth. They visited several tourist sites and mythical places of the region, including the Vertiéres, the Citadel and Sans Souci Palace, Cormier Beach and Roi Henri Christophe University in Limonade and many Haitian schools.

“Haiti is a beautiful county. Once we arrived there, we felt comfortable in this healthy environment and the people were hospitable,” said Sydney, one of the participants in this tour. During their stay, the students said they embraced many rewarding experiences. Despite communication difficulties, together they were able to enjoy their trip in Haiti.

“The tour had a small number of students, because some parents refuse their children to stay in a country like Haiti…And yet, those who agreed to come are amazed to discover this picturesque country filled with such rich history,” says Cecil Thomas, head of the delegation. Thomas, on the other hand, hopes that its partnership initiated between students from St. Louis Missouri University (SLU) campus and those of Roi Henri Christophe of Limonade (CHCL) can grow in the future and go much further with time.

The students fell under the spell of these magnificent historical treasures. Valmera enabled his fellow students to soak up the reality of Haitian culture. Graduating in Quality Control from St. Louis Community College, Valmera returned to Haiti in 2015 after graduating form SLCC to continue his work with youth and adults. Valmera heads the Union for a radical change Robillard (UCRAR), an organization that provides assistance to residents of this community section of Plaine du Nord where Valmera was raised. Robillard students visit several schools in this area  regularly, offering gifts and toys to children there.

Valmera says, “It has been a great privilege for me to share the skills that I have gained in the U.S. with people in my community. I think the best way to make a change in my comunity is to start off with something small, and it will become huge after trying to get everyone involved. I am generous with my time, since I would not be ehre I am today without getting help from others.”

Valmera is continuing his education at Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville, IL to study business and political science. His personal goal is to return to his home country and launch a business there to create job opportunities for others while forging partnerships with international businesses. There is a definite need to help Haitian student develop business skills and investment knowledge to ensure their future. In addition to promoting economic growth, Valmera wants to continue holding workshops for youth, which are focused on building business skills.

“Launching a business in Haiti is one of the most important ways to promote economic development for the country, because it will enable me to generate jobs and employ other Haitians, ” says Valmera.

NTHS

 

 

NTHS honors the achievements of leading career and technical education students, provides scholarships, and cultivates excellence in today’s highly competitive, skilled workforce. Discover us at nths.org and bring recognition to your top technical students.